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What is Bespoke?

Bespoke Begins


While Made-to-Measure begins with an existing pattern or design that will be customised or modified to suit your measurements and specifications, Bespoke begins with an entirely new concept, an entirely new pattern that is created only for you.

I offer Bespoke crochet garments, accessories, jewelry, decor and art. In Bespoke, my passion as an artist is embodied. Bespoke is for the adventurous who wants something that is truly unique and cannot be found anywhere else.

This Fragile World


The world of Bespoke, Made-to-Measure and Artisan skills are in danger of extinction as this culture of creation is inextricably linked to economic pressures. Generations of artisans and entire artisan communities suffer economically and spiritually. Many abandon the tradition or are forced into abusive labour conditions. Billions of cheap, standardised and mass produced items flood the market and determine what the next trend will be, what you will see and what you will believe the world is made of. The diversity of our sensualities simply die into one homogenous mass of taste.

I offer Made-to-Measure and Bespoke despite the dearth of demand, appreciation and respect for this dying art. There is no compromise.

Through my on-line atelier, I present to you some of the important explorations I am currently undertaking in the creation of bespoke garments and accessories. I hope that by presenting the artist’s process – from concept to casting and finishing – I am able to heighten your understanding and appreciation of the intellectual, creative and physical work that enters my atelier, that makes up the fragile world of handmade.

Fatima @bespokecrochet.com


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